I remember as a child sifting thorough a shoebox of my grandfather’s knickknacks, I came across a tie pin (yes, those were things) commemorating 30 years of service to the engineering firm from which he eventually retired.  At the time, that tie pin had little significance to me beyond the fact that it was sparkly and associated with an article of men’s attire previously foreign to me. As an adult, however, the concept of doing anything for 30 straight years seems astounding.

According to recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and some other smart people, the average job tenure for the majority of today’s workforce is about 4.4 years. People simply don’t put down roots with a team the way my grandfather’s generation did. The poor tie pin industry must be in rough shape. So imagine my awe when I sat down last week and saw an upcoming calendar entry that read: “Lynda McClure: 17-Year 2e Anniversary.”

Be still my heart, Lynda McClure has been rocking the 2e world for 17 years. An astounding consideration, given you could easily mistake her passion and presence as that of an individual no older than 20-something.

Seriously. That i

Seriously. That’s the smile of someone who just rented a car by themselves for the first time.

So this got me thinking: What is the impact of someone being part of a team for such a substantial part of their career? And how are modern businesses affected by the declining duration of that tenure? A 2015 study published in Harvard Business Review found that, surprisingly, the most tenured team members are also among the least engaged in their respective companies. This is not true about Lynda. As the author suggests, “the typical inverse relationship between tenure and engagement points to an important untapped opportunity for most organizations: the dramatic performance gains that can be made by thwarting it, and keeping long-tenured employees engaged.”

I know for a fact that on a day-to-day basis, our people stay engaged because we do amazing work for amazing clients. But what is it about our culture at 2e that inspires people like Lynda to stay passionately engaged after so many years, when it would be so easy (and human) to sit back and coast?

I believe the thing that keeps brilliant people engaged here at 2e is our mission: To drive change for brands that shape the world and positively impact the human experience.

I believe that embracing this mission, watching it play out every single day, and dreaming about how it will drive us as we head into the future, is exactly what has inspired Lynda to become such a fundamental part of our culture and team. Let’s face it, as our newly appointed Vice President of Creative (please send congratulatory bottles to the attention of R Toohey), Lynda is literally responsible for 50% of our company’s name. But over the years, she’s inspired so much more for us as people, and as a business.

With all this rattling around in my head, I landed on two fundamental truths:

  1. I cannot imagine the company we are today (which I’ll humbly suggest is pretty awesome) existing without Lynda McClure
  2. I cannot picture the future of 2e Creative (which I’ll arrogantly suggest looks pretty awesome) without Lynda McClure

So, on behalf of the hearts and hands at 2e Creative, past and present, here’s to an amazing leader, partner, artist, mentor, and — most importantly — friend. Congratulations on this amazing accomplishment. And thank you for all you’ve done — and will do — for us.

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I’ll just leave this here.